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Tanglewood https://tanglewood.com Get found, seen and talked about Tue, 12 Sep 2017 10:10:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.17 The Hero’s Journey: Using archetypes in video marketing https://tanglewood.com/blog/heros-journey-using-archetypes-video-marketing/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/heros-journey-using-archetypes-video-marketing/#respond Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:14:56 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=4051 The Hero’s Journey Have you ever wondered why so many books, films and stories seem similar? This is due to an age old story structure that has been used for thousands of years from Homer’s Odyssey to Bob Dylan songs.Joseph Campbell gave this story form a name in the late 1940s: The Hero’s Journey. The structure he proposed has been Continue Reading

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The Hero’s Journey

Have you ever wondered why so many books, films and stories seem similar? This is due to an age old story structure that has been used for thousands of years from Homer’s Odyssey to Bob Dylan songs.

The Hero's JourneyJoseph Campbell gave this story form a name in the late 1940s: The Hero’s Journey. The structure he proposed has been recognised, studied and used even more ever since. One person inspired by these ideas was a young filmmaker called George Lucas; he made The Hero’s Journey central to a few films you might have seen.

Let’s have a look at Campbell’s structure of the Hero’s Journey more closely.

  • The Hero who is usually a regular guy or gal so the audience can relate to them, hears a call to adventure, perhaps they’re restless or find a new world they weren’t aware of. Often they are reluctant and try not to accept.
  • Due to an often supernatural event, or a herald character they are persuaded to go on the adventure.
  • Crossing the threshold, hero moves out of their comfort zone.
  • There will be a road of trials the hero has to overcome to prove his/her worth
  • Followed by a huge abyss, things are looking bad, nearly gives up, someone might die here, or friends abandon them.
  • They pull themselves together, go through some kind of atonement
  • And are rewarded with some treasure or a gift or something precious
  • But it’s not over yet, oh no, they still have to flee back to safety to try to keep the treasure, power, ability, wisdom or whatever
  • But they can’t return home on their own, they need help (which might dent their ego)
  • Then they cross the threshold home and everyone is happy, but they have been changed by the experience.

The Hero’s Journey distils storytelling down to its purest form. Stories are in our blood, they are how societies have passed their customs, societal codes and history down the generations for 1,000s of years. That’s why stories can be so powerful: if they contain the right archetypal figures, events and motifs that we’ll recognise from the stories we’ve been hearing and telling all our lives, we feel a connection that resonates at a deep level.

And film is the most efficient way of telling stories. The viewer doesn’t need to imagine the scene or fill in any blanks, the information we’re imparting can move directly into the subconscious. Have you ever wondered why your dreams look like movies? In fact, it’s the other way around. Film didn’t evolve into its current form accident – it follows the pattern of our dreams. That is why film & video are so powerful to humans, they speak directly to our subconscious, animal minds.

If stories are the method of delivery, the syringe if you will, then archetypes are the tools, or the big fat needle on the end of the syringe.

Archetypes

The word archetype derives, via many twists and turns (but that’s another story…), from the Ancient Greek terms arch?, meaning “beginning or origin” and tupos, which can mean “pattern” “model” or “type.” So you could take it to mean “original pattern,” or the Platonic ideal of a character, object or event. That is to say, archetypes deal with underlying shared characteristics rather than the specific peculiarities of an individual person, object or event. They’re “types” of person or stories that we have in the back of our head and use as a sort of filing system to quickly identify new characters or stories without really thinking about it.

Carl Jung thought that archetypes are not things that we learn about during our life, but rather are embedded in us from birth, coming from our society’s collective unconsciousness. He claimed that the meanings of these archetypes are “imprinted, hardwired into our psyches, and influence the characters we love in art, literature, religion and films.”
Common archetypes

Here are some examples of common archetypes. They are not always distinct personalities, often a character will be a combination of different archetypes. There are also other archetypes that are not on this list.

How can these ideas help with video marketing?

So why am I banging on about all this? We’ve all seen marketing budgets migrate from TV and print to online because that’s where the audiences are. And how are audiences consuming content? Mostly as video – and this tendency will only increase over the next few years (stat).
Online video statistics

  • It is expected to represent 79% of consumer internet traffic in 2018.1
  • Video ads have more than four times the click-through rate (CTR) of their plain text counterparts.2
  • Furthermore, retention rate for visual information can reach 65% vs. 10% for text based information.3
  • Properly indexed videos, your site is 50x more likely to end up on the first page of search results than with text alone. 4

The trouble is online video viewers are very fickle. Quite right too! Why should anyone volunteer to waste precious time watching something salesy, cheesy or, sadly most common: just boring. People decide whether they’re going to watch a video within the first 10 seconds – and even if they stick it out, you’re only likely to have their attention for around 60-90 seconds.

So you have to get your message across as quickly and efficiently as possible. And that’s where archetypes come in. Because they hit us where we live (whether we realise it or not), they can be used as a short-cut, a short-hand that your audience will instantly recognise, and which will resonate with them on an emotional level.

 The Hero's Journey- condensed

The anthropologist Lévi-Strauss condensed the Hero’s Journey down to just 3 stages: Journey- Death- Return. It still works, that’s the beauty of these tools, just a hint can get your point across.

What better demonstration of how to condense a story into it’s elements than Vine, Twitter’s 6 second video platform. Remember when watching these to look out for the 3 stages Journey, death, return (death doesn’t always mean literal death, but just a low point of the story).

There’s no sunny side to this story:

Unlocked Peaches:


Vine magician – Zach King

Video Marketing Strategies

Contrary to popular belief, video marketing isn’t just about creating viral videos. There are different goals depending on what you want to achieve.

In conjunction with our partners at V-AMP, the video marketing engine, we’ve identified three key pathways you should be following to make video work harder for you: Get Found, Get Seen, and Get Talked About.
Video marketing pathways

To Get found, you use video content to drive customers to your website and stay there longer. To Get Seen you need social media to promote your video content. And to Get Talked About, you must start to engage with communities to create a buzz around your campaign and get people sharing your content, i.e. become your brand apostles.

Each route uses a different set of tools for a different outcome.

But whatever techniques you use and whatever your campaign goals, tapping into the power of archetypes can help your message resonate.

  • If you’re an alternative vlogger, sticking it to The Man, you can tap into the trickster/fool archetype who are subversive and anti-estiblishment
  • The silicon Valley CEOs are trying to go for the regular guy archetype when they talk to camera about their philosophy dressed in a t-shirt and shorts. It’s the “I’m a regular guy just like you despite having a personal net worth of over a gagillian dollars” archetype, which we’re all so familiar with now.
  • A business video on the about us page should follow the hero’s journey.
  • And yes, the most successful viral videos that aim to be shared use archetypes very effectively. Here are a few great examples:

Go Pro: fireman & kitten – classic hero & innocent archetypes, classic hero’s journey



P&G: Thank you mum- placing Mums as heroes



Pepsi Max: Test Drive- Trickster archetype



Volvo: Epic Splits – Hero/warrior archetype.



In the Volvo video with Van Damme, it is a bit over-the-top with the cheesy music, what they were going for here is the hero archetype but subverted, that’s where the humour lies. We’re all familiar with the character being presented, but it is being twisted slightly. This is a very effective route to humour, as with this viral video that was very successful where the lover archetype is subverted:

Old Spice: The Man Your Man Could Smell Like



Why do people share videos? That’s a massive subject, and there’s more in V-AMP’s white paper on the subject (coming soon), but essentially it boils down to social currency. People share to make themselves look cool, look caring or look intelligent to their peers. All of which can be accessed using archetypes.

How How to incorporate archetypes into your video campaign.

You don’t need to go hunting around for brand-new ideas to harness a little of the magic of archetypes for your own campaigns. The chances are, if you understand your brand, product or service well enough, and what it can do for your target audience, you’ll have the basic work in place already.

You just need to work out which archetypes are the closest match to your story, or which your customers will identify with most. When it comes to video content, always start from the viewer.  

When planning video content, always start with what you would like the video to achieve or in other words, what would you like the viewer to do after watching the video. In some cases it might be a simple brand awareness exercise, so you want the viewer to remember the brand. In other cases you want people to share content, sometimes it might be to donate, like a facebook page, whatever it is, this should be the starting point of the campaign as it informs, style, content and strategy of what to do with video once it’s made.

Start with the viewer i.   Who would you like to watch the video

ii.   Why should they watch this video

iii.   What do you want them to do after watching

iv.   How are you going to encourage them to it?

v.   These answers will inform style and content which are where archetypes and archetypal stories come in. Is it going to be grainy & retro or glossy & sleek

Choose your archetypes, based on your brand’s character, and most importantly, what will resonate with your specific target market.
Example brand archetypes

  • If your brand’s in the fortunate position of being a market leader or known for being of very high quality, you could portray it as the Ruler or the Hero (think Microsoft for the first and maybe Apple for the other);
  • but if your market standing relies on expertise, scientific advancement or insider knowledge, you might be better off as The Sage (a bit like Google)
  • If you’re trying to attract a target audience that sees themselves as free-living, above-the-herd individuals, especially if in real life they tend to be affluent, with perhaps boring jobs or lifestyles, then hit them with The Outsider (that’s Apple again, especially a few years ago, or Freelander), possibly twinned with The Creator.
  • And if your audience tends to be anxious or worried about what others will think, especially in everyday products like food, The Caretaker will help reassure them that they’re showing love and doing the right thing by using your product.

Think of 3 or 4 key descriptive words that describe the archetype that you’d like to project. Start thinking how those words can be portrayed within your content.

  • Think of existing stories and characters that you can use or subvert or deconstruct to rebuild within your own framework.

Final thoughts

Brands and businesses large and small need to be using stories now more than ever before. In the digital, social space it is good stories that are connecting to audiences. And if you’re going to tell stories, then you need the right tools for the job, archetypes and archetypal structures like the hero’s journey.

References:

1. “Cisco Visual Networking Index: Forecast and Methodology, 2013–2018.”Cisco. <http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/solutions/collateral/service-provider/ip-ngn-ip-next-generation-network/white_paper_c11-481360.html>.

2. “Digital Advertising Benchmarks.” MarketingProfs. <http://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2014/24821/digital-ad-benchmarks-performance-by-format>.

3. “Invodo Video Statistics.” Invodo. <http://www.invodo.com/resources/statistics/>.

4. “Nate Elliott’s Blog.” The Easiest Way to a First-Page Ranking on Google. <http://blogs.forrester.com/interactive_marketing/2009/01/the-easiestway.html>.

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3 types of animated video to get your business’s message across https://tanglewood.com/blog/3-types-of-animated-video-business-message/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/3-types-of-animated-video-business-message/#respond Fri, 09 May 2014 15:22:57 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=4017 As every business manager knows, you need to be clear and concise in your brand/product/services message. It builds trust, authority, and it tells the audience why they should buy into what you’re selling. Every message needs a medium Of course, it’s not always as easy to tell your audience exactly what you want to say, that, I suppose, is where Continue Reading

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As every business manager knows, you need to be clear and concise in your brand/product/services message. It builds trust, authority, and it tells the audience why they should buy into what you’re selling.

Every message needs a medium

Of course, it’s not always as easy to tell your audience exactly what you want to say, that, I suppose, is where advertisers come in. They break down your message and tell you how to deliver it in the best way. But unless you’ve got tens of thousands of pounds to spend, it’s not that accessible. That’s why more and more businesses are turning to the power of video – they can make it and distribute it relatively cheaply and potentially get it seen by a large audience.

But when it comes to your message are you sure you’re saying it succinctly, cleanly and with clarity? What I’m saying is, are you sure you’re using the right medium?

Why business video may mean animated video

The benefits of animated video are fourfold:

  1. Animated video looks great – from sleek lines to funny designs, the world is your oyster.
  2. You have absolutely no filming involved (this is great for companies without a premises, or if your product or service is not physical).
  3. Animated videos are often hugely entertaining to watch – often because they are not bound by physical laws.

And finally, and most importantly,
           4. They explain complex ideas simply.

Whether you’ve got a service that is often difficult to explain, a product that is incredibly technical, or a process that can often get audiences lost, animated video cuts through the noise – it can easily break apart complex products and techniques and present in an understandable way to your audience.

Do you need animated business videos?

Animated videos can cut through, that much is clear. But are you the right business for this type of video? We’ve come up with a few ideas of the sort of businesses who will most likely benefit from animated business videos:

  • Tech start-ups
  • Software companies
  • Web platforms and web-based products
  • Tech products and other products that might not be suitable for filming
  • 3D visualisations of buildings or other products from CAD files

Examples of the types of animations you can expect

At Tanglewood we produce business animations all the time, and for a variety of reasons. There are three main types of business animations that we provide, all of which allow for complex messages to be crystallised into easy-to-consume video:

This is an example of a fantastically concise 2D animation. The message of the video is a complex one and we received reams of difficult to construe details about the process. Where the video succeeds is to show how each part of the message fits together to form a unified whole. In short, the glove fits.

The above example of 3D animation is built from CAD files allowing the audience to explore the product in fine detail. It’s fitting for the type of video because it distils the difficult to understand, technical minutia of the product into sleek and slick 1:09 video.

This last example shows how typography can be animated together to provide a simple and effective video that explains the benefits of using their customer service software. It’s not going to go viral, it’s not going to light up the world, but it looks good, it communicates with clarity and sells the message.

What costs can you expect?

There are a lot of factors to consider when costing an animated video, but this quick guide breaks down what an average animated video can cost:

2D video:
£2000 per minute, including music licensing, voice-over and scripting.

3D video:
£3000 per minute, including music licensing, voice-over and scripting.

For a more budget video, you can ask your video production company to personalise a template. These short and effective, yet high quality, animations can cost as little as £500.

It is important to note that prices can vary depending on many of the factors, including the quality of the design work, the music choice.

What are the processes involved?

always good to know what you’re getting yourself into. Let us breakdown a few of the processes that we’ll go through in our journey together:

  • Discuss the concept (including the budget), as well as thinking about the target market to ensure that tone of voice is correct for that audience.
  • We’ll choose a style together (often based on a combination of other animations that you like).
  • We’ll write up a voiceover script.
  • We’ll then draw up a storyboard and an animatic (an animated storyboard).
  • A rough draft will be created (often with a guide voice over).
  • You will then have the chance to suggest amendments.
  • Then a final version will be completed, replete with glorious music and a professional voiceover.
  • You will LOVE it!

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From the pen of Raph Goldberg: Is online video right for you? https://tanglewood.com/blog/online-video-right/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/online-video-right/#respond Thu, 08 May 2014 15:21:38 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=4010 From the pen of Raph Goldberg, our creative director, comes a piece on why you should choose video for your business: There’s a lot around at the moment about how video can help businesses achieve more sales, but it can be a bit of a minefield. You may be asking yourself: Should I make my own video? If not, who Continue Reading

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Tanglewood Productions - Video with Vision
From the pen of Raph Goldberg, our creative director, comes a piece on why you should choose video for your business:

There’s a lot around at the moment about how video can help businesses achieve more sales, but it can be a bit of a minefield. You may be asking yourself:

  • Should I make my own video?
  • If not, who should I use to make it?
  • What should it say?
  • Does it need to feature cats or blenders if I want lots of people to watch it?
  • And what do I do with it once I’ve made it?

All valid questions, however, there are two more important questions you should be asking yourself. But before we get into there’s just a few things I’d like to let you know. If you’re not already convinced by the power of online video, you need to check this stats out.

Video promotion is over 6 times more effective than print and online – b2bmarketing.net
The chances of getting a page one listing on Google increase 53 times with video – Forrester Research
Globally, online video traffic will be 55 percent of all consumer Internet traffic in 2016 – Cisco
A minute of video is worth 1.8 million words – Forrester Research
Pages with video are 64% more likely to make a sale – Invodo

Enough of the stats – how can YOU get it right with online video (when so many businesses get it wrong!)?

Well, my advice is that whether you plan to have 1 video or 100 videos for your business – you need a video strategy. This basically boils down to two simple questions:

  1. Who do you want to watch the video?
  2. What do you want them to do after watching it?

Sounds simple but so many businesses overlook these two points and make videos that they want to make without the viewer in mind and with no clear goal. If you think of your viewer from start to finish then there is a good chance that your video will follow these simple rules:

  • Under 2 minutes long (we are all busy people)
  • Won’t use technical jargon
  • Won’t be too salesy but focus on the pains that the viewer is experiencing and how you can overcome them.
  • Won’t be poor quality (no-one will watch a video when they can’t hear what’s being said)
  • Include a call to action – tell your viewers what you would like them to do after watching e.g. give you a call or visit a particular website, or even share your video on Facebook

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Is there a business case for Google Plus marketing or is G+ the audience wasteland we hope it’s not? https://tanglewood.com/blog/business-case-using-google-plus-marketing/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/business-case-using-google-plus-marketing/#respond Thu, 08 May 2014 13:54:48 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3980 Should businesses invest their time in Google+? Social media now plays a greater part in any modern businesses marketing strategy, but with more and more time spent on social media you need to know that it is going to pay off, that it is valuable to your company. Google+ has for many years been mired in doubts over user activity, Continue Reading

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Wasteland - Denis De Freyne

Should businesses invest their time in Google+? Social media now plays a greater part in any modern businesses marketing strategy, but with more and more time spent on social media you need to know that it is going to pay off, that it is valuable to your company. Google+ has for many years been mired in doubts over user activity, suggesting that, perhaps it’s not worth it to target another social network in the quest for total market penetration.

So if you’re wondering what benefits Google+ has for business then we’re here to give you an unbiased look at the pros and cons of this social platform.

Social media strategy becomes personal

With Google’s Hummingbird update affecting the way search operates, we see a prevalence towards personal content as well as highly relevant content. This is sometimes known as S+YW, or Search + Your World. There are two things to note here; firstly, search brings up content based on your search history, as well as relevant content, and secondly, it’s relevance plus social signals on that piece of content gets it higher in SERPS. S+YW is also connected with Google+, meaning business pages have the advantage that, if connected to their customer base on Google+, will likely show up near the top for relevant searches. It really can pay to be connected to your audience.

It’s also been reported that there is a bias towards content with social engagement through Google+, such as 1+s and sharing via that platform. According to MOZ, although Matt Cutts has denied such an association, the correlation is clear.

The business benefits of Google Plus marketing

Of course, Google+ kinda forces you onto their platform. Whether that’s through Gmail, YouTube or another service. In 2013 the platform reached approximately 300M users. In many ways the centralising of Google services is a benefit. Many business and social services of Google have now become located under the umbrella of Google+, such as Google Places, which now becomes a Google+ local page.

Reviews on your Google+ local page work favourably for SEO too, pushing your own site up the rankings for related search terms. It’s a win-win situation when it comes to search. By drawing audiences through your Google+ account and getting reviews on that platform you not only strengtening your position in regards to SEO but also creating a platform to talk to your customers about bad experiences or customer service quirks they want clearing up.

Direct Connect links your Google+ page with your website – it’s makes it easier for audiences to find your Google+ page through Google search, allowing you to farm communities and get the types of interactions you want.

However, some studies have shown that Google+, despite lacking user activity, does have quite virulent interaction among its audiences.


Google Plus - Interactions as a percent of fan base

Community outreach and video hangouts

Google+ has an active user base, though one doubts it’s anywhere near as strong as Google would like to make out. Yet, those who do interact, get involved in your content.

So find the communities relevant to you, use #tags, @mentions and keywords to ensure that you’ve got the widest possible reach for your content. Be sure to respond whenever you get a reply. It’s also worth going out into the wilderness and striking up conversations, responding to queries where you can provide the right knowledge, and generally being and up-standing webizen.

Hangouts too can be a big draw. Use them to enrich the communities you engage in, focus on a specific long-tail keyword topic for bigger audiences, and answer a question at the heart of your communities. You can also use hangouts as part of a recruitment drive, for conducting interviews with noted influencers, or hosting Q&As around your products.


Google Hangout Icon

These sorts of things are the crux of content marketing and will take up significant wells of your time – BUT, and it’s a big but, the SEO impact of your content marketing strategy cannot be underestimated. The future is all about getting stuff out there and maximising interactions to draw up a substantial weight of authority.

Weighing up the cost of Google+

Stats from Nielsen point to much smaller active user figures than Facebook – Only 29 million active US users monthly, spending a total time of around 7 minutes on the platform over the month. This is pretty bad news for Google+. Yet, if we look at the ‘interaction’ study above, it does suggest that a small minority of users do active use it, and are very heavy users indeed.

So, here’s the list of business benefits:

  • Google+ links with personalised search
  • Google+ has greater SEO benefits than other platforms
  • It centralises your Google services, which benefits your performance on Google search results
  • It provides a reviewing platform
  • You can hangout there
  • Direct Connect allows a unique tool to draw audiences to your social page
  • A place for community outreach

Importantly, if you do link Google+ with your Analytics you will get a great deal of data that can inform how much time you spend on Google+ and ultimately, whether it’s worth it for your company or not. Small businesses may struggle to get interaction, primarily because the local people you service will probably not be networking there. However, for companies selling products and services to a wider audience it can be beneficial. Ultimately though, use your analytics to ensure that you’re not simply wasting your time.


Want to succeed on social media? Why not utilise the power of our V-AMP video marketing engine to boost engagement, views and fans? If you’ve got video that fails to engage we can transform it into a success. Contact us through e-mail, or through our Twitter or Google+ pages. If it’s more interesting content you’re after, stay tuned on our RSS feed. If you like it share it, or let us know in the comments underneath.

Image copywright: Denis Defreyne, licensed under Creative Commons

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How to use selfishness for video seeding, or, the Selfish Gene is alive and well and living inside of us. https://tanglewood.com/blog/use-selfishness-video-seeding/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/use-selfishness-video-seeding/#respond Thu, 08 May 2014 09:18:14 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3953 Selfishness is a trait that is often disparaged in our well-meaning society. Misinterpretation of Dawkin’s selfish gene thesis caused furore basically because people thought that meant that everyone went around doing selfish things all the time. This, as we know, is not true. Well, just like those silly people, I’m slightly giving you the run around. This article is about Continue Reading

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Richard Dawkins - The Selfish Gene

Selfishness is a trait that is often disparaged in our well-meaning society. Misinterpretation of Dawkin’s selfish gene thesis caused furore basically because people thought that meant that everyone went around doing selfish things all the time. This, as we know, is not true. Well, just like those silly people, I’m slightly giving you the run around. This article is about selfishness, but it’s also about the good things that selfishness provides us with. In this article I’ll discuss how large societies have often highly prized selfishness, and how you can harness the selfishness of your communities to affect a change in your content marketing output.

I’m talking about something I call ‘selfish-sharing’, which draws upon a number of bits of research from our up-and-coming white paper on sharing video.

Selfish sharing occurs when people share something, usually some piece of content, like a video or an article, and they do it for a perfectly selfish reason. These reasons come in many shapes and forms, whether that is to share content to get a response, sharing content to receive a prize, or sharing content to harvest social currency.

From primitive societies to cities of selfishness

In primitive societies, it has been found, sharing happens predominately along two paths. In the first, sharing offers some utility that has an overall benefit and aligns with the prosperity of the whole of society – so that where one part benefits, so does the whole.

The second is what is known as ‘direct altruism’, simply put, sharing that has no utilitarian motive and no direct benefit.

However, in more condensed societies, such altruistic behaviour goes out the window – instead, say hello to selfishness!

A recent study by Ligon and Schechter called Motives for Sharing in Social Networks describes modern society like this: ‘better- connected’ individuals are more motivated by reciprocity, and more gift-giving (outside of our experiment) is not correlated with benevolence or altruism, but is correlated with our measure of reciprocity.”

In other words – when we share something we expect something back.

The benefits of a selfish economy

So what if social networks are driven by selfishness, is that such a bad thing.

There are benefits to this of course, that people share because of selfish reasons can lead to good things. Just think of all those people sharing information about crises, in an NYT poll 84% of people said they shared because they had issues or causes that they wanted people to know about and act upon. They shared content they felt was important, and yes, it is selfish. They want to see people interact with it, they want people to share it on, but they also want to be a part of the story, they want to be the person who informed others about it.

Selfish sharing has further implications too!

How you can harness the power of selfish sharing for video seeding

Brands are currently harnessing this renegade reciprocity through competitions – Like and Share to be entered into a random prize draw, or like this enterprising (yet completely against Twitter’s guidelines) RT to win competition from Doritos.



Doritos Twitter UGC Branded Content

“Fancy winning a whole host of BRILL PARTY PRIZES? Simply RT to be in with a chance of winning stuff to make a #DoritosParty.”

But there are further and more exciting ways to get people to share selfishly. Think of all the great User-Generated Content that gets put out on Vine and Instagram. These fun videos can dramatically increase your brands presence, will last longer in the minds of your audience and will create lots of branded content that will be usable and, hopefully, shareable.

The above, quite funny, user-generated branded content is a great example of allowing audiences to get hold of your ‘intellectual’ content and remix it, re-contextualise it and redevelop some of the ideas surrounding it. It’s an example of where your company can play on the creative juices of User-Generated Content creatives harnessing their desire to make a name for themselves and play upon this ‘broad’ concept of selfishness. In the above example both parties play upon the other’s desire for social engagement, and both come out on top. It’s a great way to increase participation with your content and a unique method of video seeding

>In another way, this concept of selfish sharing is the same thing that DJs and producers and utilised for years – they access the source materials and change it into something else. But their desire to share this material opens it up to further audiences, who then take that source material and change it again, remixing, redesigning it and turning it into something new and fresh. Sharing is medium; selfishness is the driving force.

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Follow our 5 easy steps to video production success, or, how to make corporate videos and achieve your video marketing goals at the same time! https://tanglewood.com/blog/5-easy-steps-to-video-production-success/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/5-easy-steps-to-video-production-success/#respond Thu, 01 May 2014 15:30:15 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3934 Look at it from the following perspective – if you picked up a camera and started filming now, what would the end result look like? OK, so you’re probably hilarious, and you’ve just struck viral gold (or failing that, you’ve just won £250 on You’ve Been Framed), but more than likely it would be worthless. Step 1: Know why you Continue Reading

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Look at it from the following perspective – if you picked up a camera and started filming now, what would the end result look like? OK, so you’re probably hilarious, and you’ve just struck viral gold (or failing that, you’ve just won £250 on You’ve Been Framed), but more than likely it would be worthless.

HD Video Camera

Step 1: Know why you want to make a video

It sounds obvious, but plan ahead. The first thing you should ask yourself is ‘why?’ Why do you want to make a video? Why choose it? Ask yourself if it will add value to your company. There’s a really good chance it can do, but if you’re unsure about it you need to first think how you intend to use it.

Great value corporate videos are made with a purpose, depending on the goals of your video. Product videos aim to provide the audience with the benefits of the product, a how-to to help the audience overcome some technical problem. Each video has a niche and it’s really about how you can explore that niche and make it something worthwhile for you and your audience. Write down a couple of achievable goals that you think a video can provide and aim for that – it will seriously reduce headaches later!

Step 2: Understand your audience

Google Analytics Overview

We need to get data! Scour your analytics software to see who visits your websites, who buys your products, who likes your posts on Facebook. Then make your video for that audience. They’re the ones you want to aim your video at. Think about the language those people use – are they technologically literate? Will they know what enterprise server hosting (or whatever it is you sell) is? Or do they need it explained in laymen’s terms. Most of the time, the latter will be better for corporate videos. Remember, people don’t have a lot of time in their day to watch videos, so try and get them hooked before you spit out the technical jargon.

Step 3: Finding the right tone of voice

Simply sitting down and discussing how your want your company to be presented is a great way to understand what tone of voice you should use. Get a small meeting going within the office and try and generate some ideas, or work with a video production company to help you. All you want to do at this stage is to think about how your audience would like to be address. Again, this is about language and the level of understanding your audience has of the type of product or service you provide. You can’t get it right all the time. But getting a good understanding of who your audience and what you want them to do once the video finishes helps you to find the finished product.

Step 4: How to make people watch your video!

Whether you’re making a corporate video production or creating something to add to your online brand presence, you need to think deeply about the way it’s made and who is going to make it. Ultimately, this depends on where your video is going to be placed online, and again, the goal of the video.

Take how-to videos or vlogs. What’s great about these is that the informal nature of them actually appeals to audiences. If you’re describing how to get the best use out of one of your products you don’t really need an expensive, all-singing, all-dancing video. You just need an informed presenter going through the processes with clarity and simplicity. Use a screen-casting app or video camera (see our blog here for our favourites) for this, keep the camera stationary and talk clearly into the microphone. If the sound or video isn’t up to scratch you may need to record it again. It really is paramount that it looks and sounds good enough to watch, because often viewers will switch off.

In terms of hosting this video, it is advisable that you do not place it on your homepage. Instead create a service or product page and embed the video there. This will ensure that it does not clutter the homepage or ruin people’s image of your company. By labelling the video correctly you will ensure that traffic still comes to your video.

To get a better insight into hosting video, as well as best practice video SEO for your company, check out another of our video marketing posts at the link.

Want brand videos? Unfortunately, unless you have an in-house video production team, most companies can’t produce corporate videos or business videos without outside help. You want your brand to appear in the best light don’t you? So you’re gonna have to set aside some money to get it produced by a video production company.

Video is unparalleled in promoting brands to online audiences. Half of consumers say that watching video makes them more confident in purchasing products, with the amount of brand videos being watched in the US alone at 1.2 billion per day.

To tap into this growing audience you do need to compete with the best. Paying for this coverage is often the only way to do it. So get in touch with a talented and experienced digital video production company (like Tanglewood) and begin on your path to brilliant exposure through video.

Step 5: How can I get my audience to see my video?

Marketing video online leads to your audiences seeing your video. It sits closely with your video production goals. The who’s and why’s of video production lead to getting your audience to notice it. So once you’ve understood your audience and you know why you’re making your video you need to begin on a video marketing strategy. This comes in a variety of guises depending on the type of video you’ve got.

However, there are certain things that you should always do. Here are some of them:

  • Do some keyword research – here’s a great beginner’s guide from Moz
  • Make use of metadata – that means titles, descriptions and tags
  • Write a transcript – write a transcript of the video so that search engines can ‘read’ what’s in the video

There are other important techniques to do too, which can be found at our blog on video SEO. But first, get to grips with these simple steps to video production success so that you’re then in the right position to market your video. For more information on how to market your video, check out some of our blogs on video marketing.


If you’re after high quality video that performs above your expectations call Tanglewood Productions today. Alternatively, if you’re after tips and tricks, follow our Twitter feed here, sign-up to our RSS feed, or get in touch through email here.

Image copywright: Andrew Laparra, licensed under Creative Commons

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Sharpen your video marketing strategy: 4 reasons to fine-tune the way you seed your video https://tanglewood.com/blog/sharpen-your-video-marketing-strategy/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/sharpen-your-video-marketing-strategy/#respond Wed, 23 Apr 2014 11:36:40 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3781 Are your videos being shared to the right audiences? If not, why not? We’re going to quickly delve into some clever demographics to show you who the best are at sharing video are and why you should be targeting them. Yes, I’m talking optimising your video seeding channels, A.K.A, getting it to the people who are most likely to share Continue Reading

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Are your videos being shared to the right audiences? If not, why not? We’re going to quickly delve into some clever demographics to show you who the best are at sharing video are and why you should be targeting them. Yes, I’m talking optimising your video seeding channels, A.K.A, getting it to the people who are most likely to share your video.

At Tanglewood we’ve put together some research to help you out. This beautifully constructed piece of fact-finding we are calling our “4 reasons” and you definitely need to know this.

Reason 1: Men watch video more than women.
Men are more frequent viewers of video than women

In pure, cold, hard, terms, male viewers are more frequent watchers of videos then their female counterparts, across the whole of the internet.

“But that’s not relevant for me”, you think, “my audience is all female.” Fair enough, you won’t like the above stat, but continue with me for a bit longer and you’ll understand the value of this invaluable advice.

Reason 2: Young people watch more video than old people

Young people are more frequent viewers of video

Broadly speaking, young people, those from 15-34, are more frequent viewers of video then older groups – young people are your daily bread. Hold them close and nurture them, for they will pay you back in kind (with lots of video views).

Reason 3: Who watches your video shares your video

Who views is who shares

AOL/Nielsen 2010

The wild, west, egalitarian nature of the internet shown in all it’s beautiful colour!

Here we see how neatly the percentage of content sharers (in orange) sits against the percentage of actual online users (in blue). It actually pretty much says there is no difference between men and women when it comes to sharing content. This also correlates to how the real world works – i.e. nature favours no gender in terms of who shares material resources more, both men and women share and it’s quite evenly spread.

MEN WATCH MORE VIDEO + YOUNG PEOPLE WATCH MORE VIDEO = YOUNG MEN WATCH MORE VIDEO.

IF, YOUNG MEN WATCH MORE VIDEO + SHARING IS EVENLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG SEXES

THEN…

Reason 4: Young men share more video

Young men, across the global internet population, will share more video. This is because they watch more! It’s simple maths!

So what can you do to capitalise on this useful piece of video marketing strategy? Well try writing copy that you think young men will be into, make sure your headlines capture their stupid humour, their ‘witty banter’ or whatever it is these bulging, preening jocks class humour as nowadays. Get into the mind of the 20 year old male and sell your soul!

Ofcom recently wrote that, of “uses [of social media] more likely to be made by men compared to women… share video clips/content (23% vs. 12%)”.

So fine-tune the copy surrounding your video, the tone of your landing page, the headline and the ad-copy to young men – but wait, I’m being slightly facetious here, you won’t have to wear low-cut V-necks, chug whey protein or Neknominate yourself to drink a fish in a bowl of Jose Cuervo just yet…

The real take home of this piece is that just like the outside world, sharing is evenly distributed among genders. So if your target audience is overwhelmingly women just make sure that your content tries to reach them in a way that speaks to them, that makes them feel like you care about their custom. That’s how you win.


Want to get more valuable advice from Tanglewood to increase your shares, likes, re-tweets and views? Our white paper will be available for purchase shortly, so keep your eyes peeled for future announcements. You can follow us on Twitter here, or link up to our RSS feed here. Alternatively, get in touch by email, we’d love to tell you what we can do for your company.

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How to harness mobile and the second-screen on Twitter https://tanglewood.com/blog/key-industry-trends-mobile-second-screen-twitter/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/key-industry-trends-mobile-second-screen-twitter/#respond Thu, 27 Feb 2014 21:51:21 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3358 Got a smartphone? Then you probably use Twitter. In the UK 12M of us do – that’s 80% of the total Twitter population of the UK.Globally mobile access to Twitter stands at around 60%. Mobile users’ love of the platform is no doubt driven by the platform’s short-form style, its ability to aggregate news easily and its constantly up-dating news Continue Reading

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Got a smartphone? Then you probably use Twitter. In the UK 12M of us do – that’s 80% of the total Twitter population of the UK.

Globally mobile access to Twitter stands at around 60%. Mobile users’ love of the platform is no doubt driven by the platform’s short-form style, its ability to aggregate news easily and its constantly up-dating news feed.

What piques our interest though is what it means to us video marketers. If mobile users are out and about, in and out of work, sitting in front of their TV, how can we make them take notice of whatever it is we want them to notice?

If we look at the statistics they tell an intriguing story. Stats from Unruly Media puts mobile above desktop in terms of video engagement. The click-through rate (CTR) for video stands at a staggering 13.64%, over a paltry 5.45% for desktop users. It is likely that the condensed mobile platform, as well as the times that users access online content – such as sitting on the bus with headphones in – plays to the strengths of mobile engagement. And, not only has the CTR increased but interaction with video through mobile has also as increased, now standing at 22.64%. This is over 5% higher than desktop interaction.


Image credit: William Hook

How to get users to stop watching TV and watch your video instead!

Twitter’s place in the social media eco-system appears to be settling into its natural circadian rhythm, indeed a strange morning and night effect is forming. Usage increases in the morning pre-work and again in the traditional TV primetime hours. I’ve mentioned before how Twitter has been positioning itself as a partner platform, specifically a second-screen platform, to complement television.

Recently it reached its highest ever tweets per second, standing at 143,199 tps during an airing of Hayao Miyazaki’s Castle in the Sky on Japanese TV. Peak times for mobile device use (including tablets) increases dramatically after 7pm, with a total of 25.7% of all device video engagement happening between the hours of 8pm and 11pm. Targeting the primetime is critical to getting that extra reach and increased engagement for your Twitter video campaign.

With that information in your hands what’s the best way to proceed? Well currently advertisers can use a bunch of different video platforms to create the best possible video campaign, from long-form YouTube to short-form Vine. Vine works well on Twitter because of auto-play features (currently not available on mobile) as well as providing something quick and appetising – again perfect for mobile.

But really, all eye-catching and interesting videos are worthwhile, as long as you fixate on giving your audience the most relevant piece of knowledge for them.

As for making mobile users click through to your video, the key is to write attention-grabbing copy.

Imagine you’re an Upworthy headline writer for the day, think ‘This man hasn’t seen his daughter in 15 years, you’re going to be shocked when you realise why’, rather than ‘check out this specious brand awareness ad’.

Except, obviously, make sure that the copy fits your ad and isn’t just a click-baity title for no reason. The point is though, give it some thought, test out different copy for your Tweets, measure the CTR, and when you think you’re near to perfect, tweak and tweak again.


Interested in marketing to social media? Take a look at previous blog posts on the future of marketing tech, or how Facebook is taking on TV at its own game, and how you can be a part of it.

If you want help with your video marketing campaigns then get in touch, or look for tips on our Twitter. Alternatively subscribe to our RSS feed for more from our blog.

Image Copyright: William Hook, licensed under Creative Commons

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The struggles of being a Sochi 2014 advertiser https://tanglewood.com/blog/spotlight-sochi-2014-advertising/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/spotlight-sochi-2014-advertising/#respond Wed, 26 Feb 2014 11:00:54 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3363 Previously on Spotlight On, we had discussed how big corporate sponsors of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games had stayed quiet to avoid harming their brand. Now, mid-way through the games, we take another look at what is happening on the sub-tropical shores of Sochi and see if sponsors have come to terms with the complex human issues facing them. Continue Reading

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Previously on Spotlight On, we had discussed how big corporate sponsors of the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games had stayed quiet to avoid harming their brand. Now, mid-way through the games, we take another look at what is happening on the sub-tropical shores of Sochi and see if sponsors have come to terms with the complex human issues facing them. Getting expert advice on this, Bloomberg TV turned to WebiMax’s Ken Wisnefski, who assured us that advertisers have faced similar situations before and that “they haven’t really impacted advertisers to any great degree”, he also suggested that advertisers would prefer the potential reach of Olympic advertising over negative brand associations. But as we stand mid-way through the games, how has that played out?

Sponsors steer clear of Sochi 2014

Well, looking back at my initial post I had seemed to move between two poles. On the one hand I noted the tumble-weed across advertising spaces relating to this particular Olympics, on the other hand I was prepared to believe senior analysts like Wisnefski and throw my concerns far into the deepest ocean. What materialised then was very much in line with the former – advertising, especially in the UK, has all but been removed. If we take a look at McDonald’s rather sedate Sochi 2014 advertising campaign one thing is clear: there is a desperate desire to not stir the hornet’s nest.

The focus, much like P&G’s Thank You, Mom campaign, is on the individual athlete. Yet McDonald’s have done something rather more sober, entitled ‘Celebrating the Bite’ a series of videos compares chomping the gleaming golds and silvers of Olympic medallions with the indifferent crunch of masticating a McNugget – further parallels are equated between golden medals and golden chicken skin. Watch for yourself below as Shani Davis’ Olympic golden dreams are turned into a $5 box of nuggets.

This is then iterated through a number of different variations, focusing on American winter sports stars performing at Sochi. But truly global campaigns have been a rather stilted affair. McDonald’s have attempted one however, under the celebratory banner #cheerstosochi. This was a campaign which allowed McDonald’s audiences to send messages to winter Olympians through Twitter as well as through a ‘video portal’ in Sochi itself where Olympians could access direct or ‘team’ messages of support. So, was this a huge success or what?

It sounds like a great idea, but harnessing social media also means managing audience responses. And in this case, the audience were particularly aggrieved. #cheerstosochi was quickly hijacked by human rights activists appalled at the way sponsors have turned a blind-eye to some of the clampdowns on protests in and around the Olympic village. Protest videos even explain how to best to occupy McDonald’s #cheerstosochi website.

Managing comment in the digital age

What’s plain is that advertisers no longer possess the powers to halt, retract or deflect negative comments from spreading to a wide audience. Savvy activists can now hijack the best laid marketing plans, which is bad news for brands whose empire now expands across multiple territories. Interestingly, comment from We Are Social suggests that brands are actively avoiding engaging in any kind of Sochi marketing strategy in the UK. This has left a huge vacuum in which dissenters can be heard. The damage of such a position is unknown but from this point of view it seems like an incredibly naïve strategy, one which will get a lot, lot worse, before it can better – a quick search of #cheerstosochi on Twitter reveals all kinds of strongly worded affronts and will surely be of great detriment to McDonald’s UK marketers.

In my personal view sponsors left in the harrowing position of ‘damned if you do, damned if you don’t’ could have at least tried, at least stepped up to the mark. Audiences can forgive them if they try, but if they leave it they are forever left with a strong negative association with the games that will leave a bitter taste in their mouth. Especially when audiences see other commercial or public entities promoting equality through various channels, such as Channel 4’s Gay Mountain advertisement, or Canada’s Institute of Diversity and Inclusion.

Audiences are never passive

Of course, audiences are often passive, especially when you’re trying to advertise to them. But when it’s something they care about audiences always want to think about actively responding to it, even if they don’t actually respond. It makes no difference to the audience whether you’re a corporate sponsor of the games or whether you’re a commercial entity advertising in a home territory, people rarely think like that. All they’ll see is the positive or negative connotations, leaving those sponsors who dare to leave the void a void in a massive, global negative echo chamber.


Read all about how Sochi 2014 sponsors floundered at the start of the marketing push way back in 2013 at the following link.

Alternatively, if you’re interested in getting the lastest information on video marketing and production techniques, take a pick from the great content on our blog, email in, follow us on Twitter or link up to our RSS feed here.

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How Red Bull and Go-Pro have achieved viral success, and how you can do it too https://tanglewood.com/blog/digital-thread-secrets-viral-marketing/ https://tanglewood.com/blog/digital-thread-secrets-viral-marketing/#respond Tue, 25 Feb 2014 17:22:41 +0000 http://tanglewood.com/?p=3351 Red Bull and Go-Pro have both achieved huge viewer numbers. But how have they done it? Read on to find out more. Writing hilarious scripts, interesting content, shareable mother-baiting baby videos or documenting high-octane stunts is a little bit more difficult than some brands make it seem. What I’ll show you in this post is how two brand masters of Continue Reading

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Red Bull and Go-Pro have both achieved huge viewer numbers. But how have they done it? Read on to find out more.

Writing hilarious scripts, interesting content, shareable mother-baiting baby videos or documenting high-octane stunts is a little bit more difficult than some brands make it seem. What I’ll show you in this post is how two brand masters of viral create successful video after successful video. Then I’ll be offering a few statistics so that you can plan your own viral marketing video – this later content will actually feature in a long-form whitepaper that we are currently in the process of writing.

Go-Pro’s YouTube strategy

In a recent post Econsultancy laid out Go-Pro’s strategy for video distribution using the world’s number one video distribution platform, YouTube. The salient points centre on Go-Pro’s large and swelling YouTube subscriber base. Currently standing at 1,846,512 subscribers across 4 channels it is an important distribution point for Go-Pro to get their videos out there, increasing the chance of their video content shooting into viral orbit.

The question is asked, how do they do it? The answer comes back as a two-forked prong: on the one prong, engaging, exhilarating content that interests and captivates the viewer, forcing her onto the very edge of the seat as if she were to take off herself. This prong massively increases the chance of sharing the video and therefore driving further views. The second prong, the prong most easily missed and dismissed, is the prong of audience engagement; Go-Pro actively participate in YouTube comments, answering questions, driving discussion and posting further links to other content. This strategy, Econsultancy tell us, increases their subscriber base. The simple formula, they say, is ‘REGULAR CONTENT + ENGAGEMENT = SUBSCRIBERS’.

For Go-Pro, this formula seems not only natural, but very powerful.

GoPro HERO3: Almost as Epic as the HERO3+

Red Bull’s content strategy has wings

For Red Bull, strategy lies in brand awareness. Exposing the brand to as wide an audience as possible increases people buying the product, as well as opening up avenues for further product lines – such as media content, like films or documentaries.

Dietrich Mateschitz, the creator of Red Bull, expresses the Red Bull attitude towards content marketing as so:

[as] a major content provider, it is our goal to communicate and distribute the ‘World of Red Bull’ in all major media segments, from TV to print to new media to our music record label.

It’s all about maximum penetration in areas linked to the products focus for the Red Bull drink, which is “about improving endurance, concentration, reaction time, speed, vigilance, and emotional status.” Therefore the strategy focuses on that, targeting young males, thrill-seekers, extreme sports fans and other related demographics. In doing so, Red Bull’s content is about “making content that its audience will want to see”. Interestingly, and this will be something I focus on later, it includes figuring out “how to remove as much branding as possible.”

This last phrase is key. Red Bull’s marketing strategists believe that removing branding accelerates, or at least does not inhibit, the virality of their content. It’s an interesting assumption and plays on some contrary research we have found. Whatever the reality though, one can’t deny the virality of Red Bull video content. Their highest viewed video is the dramatic Felix Baumgartner Stratos jump, which currently has 36,124,210 views. Wow!

Felix Baumgartner’s supersonic freefall from 128k’ – Mission Highlights

The science behind viral video

Looking at the two brands simultaneously, we can see similarities in their approach. Both have large YouTube subscriber bases, both use exciting, thrilling and electrifying live-action content to appeal to audiences and both reduce branding to a minimum. How does this fit in with what we know about the way audiences respond to video?

Using data from Karen Nelson-Field’s The Science of Sharing we can see the right and wrong of their approach. First, let’s focus on the creative aspects of their video. According to Nelson-Field, the best way to engage audiences is to use high-arousal, positive valence content – to you and me that means a complete LOLocaust of a video. But actually, exhilarating, edge-of-your-seat content works even better. Ever notice all those people posting high-octane, insane videos of people flying in-between natural gaps carved out of mountain sides – well, that’d be because us humans absolutely love danger, especially if we can watch at a distance.

Secondly, and perhaps most importantly, the major stumbling block for brands to get traction on their video is poor distribution channels – Red Bull and Go-Pro have this in abundance. A large distribution channel means a greater chance to improve the reach of your content. And if they’re subscribers as well, they’re probably more likely to share this content, improving on what’s called the ‘reproduction rate’ of content. For more information on reproduction rate look at Duncan Watt’s superb Viral Marketing for the Real World.

In terms of the previous two aspects of virality, Red Bull and Go-Pro seem to be doing it right. But Nelson-Field does take umbrage with one particular view – that online advertising is somehow different to TV advertising, and therefore, that branding does not have to appear, either at all, or very little. According to Nelson-Field there is no data to show any difference between the two mediums whatsoever. A viewer will consume, share and engage with the video in exactly the same way.

How do you tap into that knowledge?

So, what can you do to increase the chances of your content going viral? The best suggestion is to start by making video content; make it interesting, funny, engaging, anything really – just remember that you’re making it for an audience and not for yourselves. The best type of viral content focuses on similar things to Red Bull and Go-Pro (crazy exciting videos), or genuinely hilarious videos. Creative devices like babies or cats generally make little difference, so really it’s about making your story appealing in an hilarious, exciting, amazing kind of way.


Viral marketing is part of what we do here at Tanglewood, so if you want your video content to be seen from space take a look our viral platform V-AMP. We can’t promise that you’ll be the next Red Bull but we’d love to throw you from a helium balloon in the name of 36 Million views.

For more talk on viral, video marketing or VSEO be sure to join us at this blog, you can add it as a RSS feed here, or connect with us on Twitter here. If you’d like to speak about your viral videos email in for a direct response.

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